dynamicoceans:

A grey whale eye with it’s prey swimming past it.

dynamicoceans:

A grey whale eye with it’s prey swimming past it.

asylum-art:

Yusuke Sakai: “Skin’

Japanese photographer Yusuke Sakai, born in Osaka in 1984, has decided to take a close-up, the skin of different animals across the planet. Gathered under the heading “Skins” snapshots lead to rather surprising visual and aesthetic experiences. Between feathers, leather and fur, each epidermis leads to a balanced composition, punctuated by the play of colors, patterns and textures. In spring a symbolic hymn to diversity, the choice of frames, each evoke an object, sensation or even a familiar space. A conceptual sampling so that art and biology intersect.

1. Guinea fowl

2.White bear

3.Bactrian camel 

4.African Elephant

5. Reticulatad Giraffe

6.  Asiatic black bear

7. Zebra

8. American flamingoGoat

9. Japanese Deer

10. Hippopotamus

(via ecologybiology)

seraphica:

These psychedelic images aren’t abstract art - they’re close-up images of starfish, by Alexander Semenov [via]

(via mindblowingscience)

asylum-art:

Stunning Images Show Life: Magnified exhibition by as Much as 50,000 Times

If you find yourself in Virginia’s Dulles International Airport through November of this year, you might see the exhibition Life: Magnified on the walls. It features scientific images showing cells and other scenes of life magnified by as much as 50,000 times.

  1. Zebrafish embryo
  2. Relapsing Fever Bacterium (Gray) on Red Blood Cells
  3. Mouth Parts of a Lone Star Tick
  4. Gecko lizard toe hairs inspired the design of medical adhesives
  5. An insect tracheal cell (green) delivers air to muscles (red)
  6. Anglerfish Ovary Cross-Section
  7. A Mammalian Eye Has Approximately 70 Different Cell Types
  8. Human Liver Cell (Hepatocyte)
  9. Developing Zebrafish Fin
  10. Human blood with red blood cells, T cells (orange) and platelets (green)

(via mindblowingscience)

sixpenceee:

These robots are becoming more creepy & realistic by the day. 
The fact that we tend to be creeped out by things resembling human beings but aren’t naturally human beings is called the uncanny valley effect
It stems from an evolutionary tendency to be repulsed by anyone who looks sick or unhealthy or wrong. In other words, “pathogen avoidance.”
Another is that the uncanny valley, particularly in regards to humanoid robots, triggers an innate fear of death, as they often seem to move like lifeless puppets, reminding us of our own mortality.
Look at these 10 examples and see if they make you feel unsettled.
10 EXAMPLES

sixpenceee:

These robots are becoming more creepy & realistic by the day. 

The fact that we tend to be creeped out by things resembling human beings but aren’t naturally human beings is called the uncanny valley effect

It stems from an evolutionary tendency to be repulsed by anyone who looks sick or unhealthy or wrong. In other words, “pathogen avoidance.”

Another is that the uncanny valley, particularly in regards to humanoid robots, triggers an innate fear of death, as they often seem to move like lifeless puppets, reminding us of our own mortality.

Look at these 10 examples and see if they make you feel unsettled.

10 EXAMPLES

(via mindblowingscience)

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Gianna Nannini - Meravigliosa Creatura

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